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Guest Talk "Inspired and Effective: The Role of the Ideal Self in Well Being, Job Engagement and Positive Organizational Behaviors"

Our group "Knowledge Based Management" (wu.ac.at/kbm) cordially invites you to a guest lecture by Prof. Hector Martinez from the INCAE Business School in Costa Rica.  INCAE works closely with Harvard and is the No. 1 business school in Latin America.
Hector Martinez researches and teaches in the field of Organizational Behaviour and has been intensively involved with the Intentional Change Theory of Boyatzis. Due to the cooperation of our group "Knowledge Based Management" with the INCAE Business School we are pleased to welcome Prof. Martinez for a research stay next week. In this context, the guest lecture will take place on Monday June, 24th at 4.30 pm in the seminar room D2. 0.030.

Inspired and Effective: The Role of the Ideal Self in Well Being, Job Engagement and Positive Organizational Behaviors

Prof. Hector Martinez 

Date/Time: 24.06.2019, 4:30 pm 

Location: D2.0.030 

Abstract 

While the ideal self concept has been used as a component of several motivation theories (Markus & Wurf, 1987; Higgins, 1987, 1998; Boyatzis & Akrivou, 2006), it has not received as much empirical research attention, and even less quantitative research. This study extends work on the measurement of a broad, aspirational and inspirational ideal self—defined as “an evolving, motivational core within the self, focusing a person’s desires and hope, aspirations and dreams, purpose and calling” (Boyatzis & Akrivou, 2006: 625)—to explain how employees find meaning and behave at work. This study proposes that employees who find opportunities for synergy between their job roles and their ideal self are more engaged, feel better about their lives, are perceived to better perform their jobs, and are better organizational members who go out of their way to help their peers. Findings provide evidence that the ideal self impacts the meaningfulness employees find in their work and their engagement in extra-role behaviors.



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