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Guest speakers

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Prof. Paul du Gay, Copenhagen Business School:

Titel: ORGANIZATION (THEORY) AS A WAY OF LIFE

Ort:  TC.5.12
Zeit: Dienstag, 19. Jänner 2016, 16:30 Uhr

Abstract zum Vortrag:
To the extent that ‘classical organization theory’ is seen to possess any enduring interest it is mainly as a historic artefact. The idea that the principles, axioms, adages and devices elaborated by its proponents any longer possess traction in the present is rarely countenanced. In contrast to this customary view, the paper seeks to indicate the continuing significance of classical organization theory, for both analysing and intervening in organizational life. This necessitates a reconstruction of the conventional understanding of this received term, one in which classical organization theory is viewed less as ‘theory’ in the conventional sense, but rather as a geographically dispersed, institutionally disconnected, and historically discontinuous ‘stance’, characterised, inter alia, by a pragmatist call to experience, an antithetical attitude to ‘high’ or transcendental theorising, and, not least, an ethical focus on organizational effectiveness born of a close connection to ‘the work itself’ or ‘the situation at hand’. Deploying the term ‘classic organization theory’ in this way, to refer to a stance, attitude or comportment, and an associated persona that bears it, we are able to highlight the significant differences between this comportment and the increasingly ‘metaphysical’ attitude characterising many contemporary approaches to organization and organizing, not simply in organization studies, but also more widely in sociology and cultural economy.

Paul du Gay came to CBS in late 2008 as a 'Globaliseringsprofessor' at IOA. Prior to that, he was Professor of Organizational Behaviour at Warwick Business School, and Professor of Sociology and Organization Studies at the Open University, UK. His research interests have been and continue to be located on the cusp of sociology, politics, history and cultural studies, with a key focus on questions of organization and identity. Currently, Paul du Gay’s two main research foci concern (a) reviving Organization Theory (OT) as 'a practical science of Organizing', via an engagement with OT's own past, and (b) reviving notions of 'Office', 'Ethos', 'Persona' and practices of casuistical reasoning in the context of public administration and state service more generally. At CBS, he is Co-Director of the School's Business in Society 'Public-Private Platform’, Director of the collective Velux Research Programme 'What Makes Organization?’, and a member of the School wide appointments and promotion committee (CWAC).

René Bekkers, VU University Amsterdam:

THE ANALYSIS OF REGIONAL DIFFERENCES IN PHILANTROPY: EVIDENCE FROM THE EUROPEAN SOCIAL SURVEY, THE EUROBAROMETER AND THE GIVING IN THE NETHERLANDS PANEL SURVEY

Ort:  TC.4.13
Zeit: Dienstag, 16. Juni 2015, 16:00 Uhr

Abstract zum Vortrag:
This paper explores regional differences in philanthropy, as an empirical illustration of a theoretical paper which will be published in The Routledge Companion to Philanthropy, Edited by Jenny Harrow, Tobias Jung and Susan Phillips. From a theoretical point of view, differences between countries in philanthropy can be explained by a plethora of different theories and hypotheses, identifying legal, economic, and political conditions; religious traditions and social values unique to the region; social structure and the local need for charitable contributions, and even geophysical and meteorological characteristics. In the paper, I analyze data from three different datasets that contain questions on contributions of money to nonprofit organizations. Evidence from these surveys suggests that the practices and traditions in philanthropy differ strongly between countries, not only in the size and nature of philanthropy, but also in the methods used to contribute to nonprofit organizations. The European Social Survey (ESS) included a module in 2002 asking questions about engagement in philanthropy. I review the validity and reliability of this dataset, comparing it to the Eurobarometer, the Giving in the Netherlands Panel Survey, and the Gallup World Poll. I pay explicit attention to the quality of fieldwork procedures and the validity of the questionnaires. In the empirical analyses I apply hierarchical regression models showing that the bulk of cross-national differences in philanthropy is due to population composition (characteristics of citizens), and not to context effects (characteristics of countries). The paper concludes with an assessment of the current state of knowledge on regional differences in philanthropy.

Dr. René H.F.P. Bekkers is the Royal Netherlands Academy of Arts and Sciences (KNAW) - Van der Gaag Stichting Extraordinary Professor Social Aspects of Prosocial Behavior, and Director of the Center for Philanthropic Studies at VU University Amsterdam, the Netherlands. He studied sociology and philosophy in Nijmegen and obtained a PhD in Utrecht in 2004. His research on prosocial behavior takes a multidisciplinary perspective on philanthropy, volunteering, blood donation and helping behavior. Since 2000, he is on the design team of the Giving in the Netherlands Panel Survey. Bekkers is an internationally renowned expert in the sociology and psychology of altruism and survey design and published in international scientific journals in a variety of social science disciplines. His current research focuses on determinants and consequences of charitable giving and volunteering.

Helmut K. Anheier, Hertie School of Governance:

ACHTUNG: Termin entfällt!!

Ort:  TC.4.13
Zeit: Dienstag, 02. Juni 2015, 16:00 Uhr

Angela M. Eikenberry, University of Nebraska:

CREATING SOCIAL CHANGE? COLLABORATIVE PHILANTROPISTS, ETHICAL CONSUMERS, AND POLITICAL ENGAGEMENT 

Ort:  TC.4.13
Zeit: Dienstag, 19. Mai 2015, 16:00 Uhr

Abstract zum Vortrag:
Changes in society, including increased marketization, individualization, and the shifting role of government in a network governance environment have led to variations in how people perceive and act out their role as citizens. Philanthropy and consumption are increasingly seen as legitimate avenues for political participation and means to create social change. This presentation draws on research from a study of collaborative philanthropy—giving circles—in the UK and U.S., and from a case study of ethical consumption—cause-related marketing or consumption philanthropy—in the U.S., to examine the degree to which participation as collaborative philanthropists or ethical consumers might lead to political engagement and social change.

Angela Eikenberry is a Professor in the School of Public Administration at the University of Nebraska at Omaha and advisor for the U.S. News & World Report #11 ranked Nonprofit graduate program. Her research has been featured on National Public Radio’s All Things Considered and in the Stanford Social Innovation Review. Her book, Giving Circles: Philanthropy, Voluntary Association, Democracy (Indiana University Press) won CASE’s 2010 John Grenzebach Research Award for Outstanding Research in Philanthropy. She was recently named the David C. Scott Diamond Alumni Professor of Public Affairs and awarded a 2014-2015 Fulbright Scholar Award to conduct research on giving collaboratives in the UK.

Gili Drori, The Hebrew University of Jerusalem:

"MEMORIES AND DREAMS OF ORGANIZATIONS: NARRATING TIME AND SPACE IN THE MISSION STATEMENTS OF ACADEMIA IN ISRAEL, 2000-2015"

Ort:  TC.4.13
Zeit: Dienstag, 12. Mai 2015, 16:00 Uhr

Abstract zum Vortrag:

Memories and Dreams of Organizations: Narrating time and space in the mission statements of academia in Israel, 2000-2015
Gili S. Drori and Ravit Mizrahi-Shtelman
Department of Sociology and Anthropology, The Hebrew University of Jerusalem

Mission statements have become ubiquitous markers of modern organization and arenas for the rationalized exhibition of organizational identity, also among academic organizations, and as such they they have also became the target of academic study. Joining the chorus of calls to reintroduce historicity into analysis of organization and organizations, we propose to interject a temporal perspective onto organizational identity. Clearly, some matters of time and history have been at the heart of the study of organizational identity for a while: process-oriented research considered the formation of organizational identity and over-time change in organizational identity. Rather than viewing temporality as an on-going process, in this work we introduce temporality as a referent for identity. Specifically, we investigate how time (past, present and future) and space (here and there) are evoked as a memory and as a dream. By revealing the time and space referentials of academic organizations in Israel, we show that such narratives of memories and dreams convey the identity paradox of academia during the era of globalization – struggling between local relevance and global ranking and between a glorious past and the aspiration to shape the future. And although mission statements are crafted to exhibit a coherent identity narrative or brand identity, such identity paradoxes are inherent to the glocal habitus and thus are persistently conveyed in the mission statements of universities and colleges.

Gili S. Drori is an Associate Professor of sociology and anthropology at The Hebrew University of Jerusalem (HUJI), Israel. She was awarded Ph.D. in sociology by Stanford University in 1997. Before joining HUJI in 2011, she was at Stanford University for 22 years, initially as a graduate student and later as a lecturer and Director of Honors Program in International Relations. She also taught at the University of California Berkeley, the Technion in Israel, and University of Bergamo and in 2010 she was a guest scholar at the Forum on Peace, Democracy and Justice at Uppsala University.

Gilis‘s research interests include the comparative study of science and innovation, globalization, and rationalization. She also studies branding, world culture, technology entrepreneurship, higher education, and global health – analyzing all from an institutionalist and comparative perspective. Her current research agenda concerns the branding of universities (how marketing strategies shape higher education and its organization), business and technological entrepreneurship (how economic arrangements and business practices reflect global ideas, often in disconnect from local context), and the rationalization of governance and management (how professionalization joins other institutional forces in shaping governance models and propelling their global diffusion).

Woody Powell, Stanford University:

The PROBLEM OF EMERGENDE

Ort:  TC.4.13
Zeit: Dienstag, 28. April 2015, 16:00 Uhr

Abstract zum Vortrag:

The Problem of Emergence
John F. Padgett and Walter W. Powell

The social sciences are rich with ideas about how choice occurs among alternatives, but have little to say about the invention of new alternatives in the first place.  John Padgett and Woody Powell directly address the question of emergence, both of what we choose and who we are.  With the use of sophisticated deductive models building on the concept of autocatalysis from biochemistry and rich historical cases studies spanning seven centuries, they develop a novel theory of the co-evolution of social networks.  Novelty in new persons and new organizational forms emerges from spillovers across multiple, intertwined networks.  To be sure, actors make relations; but the mantra of this book is that in the long run relations make actors.  Through case studies of early capitalism and state formation, communist economic reforms and transition, and technologically advanced capitalism and science, the authors analyze speciation in the context of organizational novelty.  Drawing on ideas from both the physical sciences and the social sciences, and incorporating novel computational, historical, and network analyses, this book offers a genuinely new approach to the question of emergence. The introductory chapter of the book is attached, along with the jacket copy.

Walter W. Powell is Professor of Education (and, by courtesy) Sociology, Organizational Behavior, Management Science and Engineering, and Communication, Co-Director of the Center on Philanthropy and Civil Society, and was Director of the Scandinavian Consortium for Organizational Research at Stanford University. He has been a member of the board of directors of the Social Science Research Council since 2000, and an external faculty member at the Santa Fe Institute since 1999. Powell works in the areas of organization theory, economic sociology, and the sociology of science.

His 1990 article, “Neither Market Nor Hierarchy: Network Forms of Organization” won the 1991 Max Weber prize for best paper in the field of organizations; and “Network Dynamics and Field Evolution: The Growth of Inter-Organizational Collaboration” with D. White, K. Koput, and J. Owen-Smith (American Journal of Sociology, 2005), received the 2007 Viviana Zelizer prize for best paper in economic sociology. “Technological Change and the Locus of Innovation: Networks of Learning in Biotechnology” with K. Koput and L. Smith-Doerr (1996), was recognized by Administrative Science Quarterly as its most influential scholarly publication in 2002. His 1983 paper, “The Iron Cage Revisited: Institutional Isomorphism and Collective Rationality in Organizational Fields” with Paul DiMaggio, is the most cited article in the history of the American Sociological Review.

Powell is the author or editor of: The Culture and Commerce of Book Publishing, with Lewis Coser and Charles Kadushin (Basic Books, 1982); Getting into Print: The Decision-Making Process in Scholarly Publishing (U. of Chicago Press, 1985); The New Institutionalism in Organizational Analysis, with Paul DiMaggio (U. of Chicago Press, 1991); Private Action and the Public Good, with Elisabeth Clemens (Yale U. Press, 1997); and The Nonprofit Sector, with Richard Steinberg (Yale U. Press, 2006). He received his PhD in Sociology from SUNY – Stony Brook in 1978, and previously taught at Yale, MIT, and the University of Arizona. He holds honorary degrees from Uppsala University, Copenhagen Business School, and the Helsinki School of Economics, and is a foreign member of the Swedish Royal Academy of Science.

Woody Powell, Stanford University:

POISEDNESS AND PROPAGATION: ORGANIZATIONAL EMERGENCE AND THE TRANSFORMATION OF CIVIC ORDER IN 19TH-CENTURY NEW YORK CITY

Ort:  TC.4.13
Zeit: Dienstag, 14. April 2015, 16:00 Uhr

Abstract zum Vortrag:
The emergence of novelty, especially of new categories of people and organizations, is undertheorized in the social sciences. Some social worlds are more hospitable to novel introductions or exogenous perturbations than others. Explaining this relative “poisedness” is essential to understanding when and why new organizational forms appear, persist, and expand, both cognitively and geographically. We offer a comparative analysis of two cases of emergence in 19th-century New York City that examines the conditions under which a new organizational form—a research-intensive botanical garden—developed and took root. We show that social worlds are highly poised when environmental, intellectual, and civic factors have reinforcing consequences. Poisedness is amplified when the social character of the individuals produced by specific historical milieux attunes these innovators to the larger social and material processes that favor the creation of new modes of organization. Although our analysis of poisedness is fixed on a specific time and place, New York City over the course of the 19th century, our arguments about the emergence of new organizational forms apply readily to other settings and time periods.

Walter W. Powell is Professor of Education (and, by courtesy) Sociology, Organizational Behavior, Management Science and Engineering, and Communication, Co-Director of the Center on Philanthropy and Civil Society, and was Director of the Scandinavian Consortium for Organizational Research at Stanford University. He has been a member of the board of directors of the Social Science Research Council since 2000, and an external faculty member at the Santa Fe Institute since 1999. Powell works in the areas of organization theory, economic sociology, and the sociology of science.

His 1990 article, “Neither Market Nor Hierarchy: Network Forms of Organization” won the 1991 Max Weber prize for best paper in the field of organizations; and “Network Dynamics and Field Evolution: The Growth of Inter-Organizational Collaboration” with D. White, K. Koput, and J. Owen-Smith (American Journal of Sociology, 2005), received the 2007 Viviana Zelizer prize for best paper in economic sociology. “Technological Change and the Locus of Innovation: Networks of Learning in Biotechnology” with K. Koput and L. Smith-Doerr (1996), was recognized by Administrative Science Quarterly as its most influential scholarly publication in 2002. His 1983 paper, “The Iron Cage Revisited: Institutional Isomorphism and Collective Rationality in Organizational Fields” with Paul DiMaggio, is the most cited article in the history of the American Sociological Review.

Powell is the author or editor of: The Culture and Commerce of Book Publishing, with Lewis Coser and Charles Kadushin (Basic Books, 1982); Getting into Print: The Decision-Making Process in Scholarly Publishing (U. of Chicago Press, 1985); The New Institutionalism in Organizational Analysis, with Paul DiMaggio (U. of Chicago Press, 1991); Private Action and the Public Good, with Elisabeth Clemens (Yale U. Press, 1997); and The Nonprofit Sector, with Richard Steinberg (Yale U. Press, 2006). He received his PhD in Sociology from SUNY – Stony Brook in 1978, and previously taught at Yale, MIT, and the University of Arizona. He holds honorary degrees from Uppsala University, Copenhagen Business School, and the Helsinki School of Economics, and is a foreign member of the Swedish Royal Academy of Science.

Ulf Papenfuß, Universität Leipzig:

"CORPORATE GOVERNANCE: INTERNATIONALE BEFUNDE UND FORSCHUNGSPERSPEKTIVEN FÜR PUBLIC MANAGEMENT UND PUBLIC POLICY"

Ort:  TC.4.18
Zeit: Mittwoch, 18. März 2015, 15:30 Uhr

Ulf Papenfuß ist Juniorprofessor für Public Management an der Universität Leipzig. Von 2008 bis 2013 war er wissenschaftlicher Mitarbeiter an der Professur für Verwaltungswissenschaft, insbesondere Steuerung öffentlicher Organisationen sowie an der Professur für Allgemeine Betriebswirtschaftslehre an der Helmut-Schmidt-Universität/Universität der Bundeswehr Hamburg. Von 1999 bis 2013 war er Angehöriger der Bundeswehr. Nach Ausbildung und Einsatz als Offizier der Feldjägertruppe, studierte er von 2002 bis 2006 Betriebswirtschaftslehre an der Helmut-Schmidt-Universität und war im Anschluss als Offizier in Köln und Berlin eingesetzt. Seine Forschungsschwerpunkte liegen im Feld Public Corporate Governance und öffentliches Beteiligungsmanagement/-Controlling.

Marieke van den Brink, Radboud University Nijmegen:

"GENDER PRACTICES IN THE CONSTRUCTION OF ACADEMIC EXCELLENCE: SHEEP WITH FIVE LEGS"

Ort:  TC.4.13
Zeit: Dienstag, 17. März 2015, 16:00 Uhr

 

Abstract
Academic excellence is allegedly a universal and gender neutral standard of merit. This article examines exactly what is constructed as academic excellence at the micro-level, how evaluators operationalize this construct in the criteria they apply in academic evaluation, and how gender inequalities are imbued in the construction and evaluation of excellence. We challenge the view that the academic world is governed by the normative principle of meritocracy in its allocation of rewards and resources. Based on an empirical study of professorial appointments in the Netherlands, we argue that academic excellence is an evasive social construct that is inherently gendered. We show how gender is practiced in the evaluation of professorial candidates, resulting in disadvantages for women and privileges for men that accumulate to produce substantial inequalities in the construction of excellence.

Prof.in Dr. Marieke van den Brink is an Associate Professor at the Institute for Management Research at Radboud University Nijmegen, the Netherlands. Her main research interest focuses on ways (gender) inequalities are produced and countered in organizations. She is currently working on a large scale case study research on diversity, organizational learning and change, and a comparative research on gender and precarious workers in European universities. Her work has been published in the Journal of Management Studies, Organization Studies, Organization, Human Relations, Gender, Work & Organization, and Social Science & Medicine. Marieke is member of the Editorial Board of the British Journal of Management and Associate Editor of Gender Work and Organization.

Femida Handy, University of Pennsylvania:

"BENEFITS OF VOLUNTEERING BY IMMIGRANTS: SOCIAL CAPITAL AND ECONOMIC INTEGRATION"

Ort:  D2.0.374
Zeit: Dienstag, 27. Jänner 2015, 16:00 Uhr

Abstract zum Vortrag:
This lecture reports on findings of research on the integration of immigrants to Canada. In particular, we examine if and how volunteering experiences can attenuate the effects of dislocation for immigrants as they seek to regain social and human capital lost in the migration process. We gather quantitative and qualitative data to explore the volunteering experiences of immigrants in ethnic congregations in four Canadian cities. Data was gathered in four Canadian cities: 754 first-generation immigrant surveys, 33 focus groups, and 34 in-depth interviews, in four Canadian cities.

Using a grounded theory approach, they propose a conceptual framework that delineates factors at the individual and organizational levels. Although individual-level factors are useful determinants of volunteer participation, for immigrants organizational factors are also an important part of the picture. These factors influence immigrants’ volunteer participation rates and the intensity of their participation. The benefits of volunteering include the enhancement of social and human capital, which provides a stepping-stone for the integration of immigrants into the host society.

Femida Handy is Professor of Social Policy at the University of Pennsylvania. Her research and teaching focus on the economics of the nonprofit sector, volunteering, philanthropy, nonprofit entrepreneurship and microfinance.

Professor Handy has written award winning articles on all aspects of the nonprofit sector including international comparative scholarship on volunteering. Her books include Grass-roots NGOs by women for women: The driving force of development in India and From Seva to Cyberspace: The changing face of volunteering in India. She is currently finishing two books on philanthropy:  The Palgrave Research Companion to Global Philanthropy (co-edited with RSM’s Pamala Weipking) and the Practice and Promise of Philanthropy in India (co-authored with M. Kassam) In addition she has co-written a children’s book Sandy’s Incredible Shrinking Footprint that introduces the concept ecological footprint to children and co-edited Sense and sustainability: Integrating knowledge in environmental studies.

She has published numerous articles in scientific journals and books on a variety of topics related to nonprofits including award-winning research published in a variety of journals.

Prior to being appointed as Editor-in-Chief, Nonprofit and Voluntary Sector Quarterly, (along with Lucas Meijs and Jeffrey Brudney), the premier journal in the field, she served on the editorial board of several academic journals. Prior to coming to the University of Pennsylvania in 2003, Professor Handy was at York University in Toronto, Canada

Silke Boenigk, Universität Hamburg:

"SEVEN TRADE-OFFS IN MEASURING NONPROFIT PERFORMANCE AND EFFECTVENESS"

Ort:  D2.0.392
Zeit: Dienstag, 13. Jänner 2015, 16:00 Uhr

Abstract zum Vortrag:
To complement contemporary nonprofit literature, which mainly offers theory-driven recommendations for measuring nonprofit effectiveness, performance, or related concepts; this article presents seven trade-offs for researchers and practitioners to consider before engaging in a nonprofit effectiveness measurement project. For each trade-off, we offer examples and suggestions to clarify the advantages and disadvantages of methodological choices that take various contextual elements into account. In particular, we address the differences between formative and reflective approaches, as well as the differences between unit of interest, unit of data collection, and unit of analysis. These topics require more in-depthattention in the nonprofit effectiveness literature to avoid misinterpretations and measurement biases. Finally, this article concludes with five avenues for further research to help address key challenges that remain in this research area.

Silke Boenigk ist Inhaberin der Professur für BWL an der Universität Hamburg, insb. Management von Öffentlichen, Privaten & Nonprofit-Organisationen. Ihr Forschungsinteresse richtet sich auf Führungsfragen an der Schnittstelle zwischen Staat, Markt und Nonprofit-Organisationen. Sie beforscht die Besonderheiten bei der Unternehmensführung von spendensammelnden Organisationen, Verbänden, Vereinen sowie Stiftungen. Branchenbezogen stehen Themen im Gesundheits-, Kultur-, Stiftungs- und Hochschulmanagement im Vordergrund. Prof. Dr. Silke Boenigk ist, gemeinsam mit Prof. Dr. Michel Clement, Fakultät BWL, Leiterin der Forschungskooperation Gesundheitsmarketing in Kooperation mit dem DRK-Blutspendedienst Nord-Ost.  Ihre akademische Ausbildung erfolgte in Deutschland, der Schweiz und in den USA. 2007 Guest Research am Center on Philanthropy, Indiana University Purdue University Indianapolis, USA. Zuvor Lehr- und Forschungstätigkeit an der Universität Fribourg sowie Mannheim. Sie habilitierte sich an der Universität Fribourg, Schweiz. Im Jahr 2002 Promotion an der Universität Basel. 1997 Abschluss des Studiums der Betriebswirtschaftslehre an der Westfälischen-Wilhelms-Universität Münster. 

Frau Prof. Dr. Boenigk ist Prodekanin Studium und Lehre der Fakultät Wirtschafts- und Sozialwissenschaften. Aktuell engagiert sich Silke Boenigk ehrenamtlich als Präsidentin des Hamburger Spendenparlaments.

Frank den Hond, Hanken School of Economics:

„SOCIAL MOVEMENTS AND ORGANIZATIONAL ANALYSIS”

Ort:  TC.4.04
Zeit: Dienstag, 16. Dezember 2014, 16:00 Uhr

Abstract zum Vortrag:
We offer an alternative take on how organizational analysis speaks to social movement scholarship. Taking a less formal view on organizations, we break down the concept of “organization” in several constitutive elements: membership, rules, hierarchy, monitoring, and sanctioning. Following Ahrne and Brunsson (2011) we argue that the amount of “organization” may vary and that both the presence and absence of organizational elements may be associated with issues, problems, tensions, and conflict within social movements. We argue that changing the composition of the set of organizational elements is one way to address these. As the context for movements continuously changes, the presence of organizational elements will also vary over time. Our approach thus provides an alternative answer to the question of whether “organization” is beneficial or detrimental to mobilization, as this depends on the contingent balance between various organizational elements.

Frank den Hond is Professor of Management and Organization at Hanken School of Economics and at the Department of Organization Sciences at VU Amsterdam. He is currently editor-in-chief of Organization Studies. His research is situated at the crossroads of institutional organization and social movement theories, focusing on corporate social responsibility (CSR), corporate political activities (CPA), standards, and social movement organization and activities.

Johanna Mair, Hertie School of Governance:

„NO TOILET, NO BRIDGE: GENDER POWER AND INSTITUTIONAL DYNAMICS IN FIGHTING INEQUALITY”

Ort:  TC.4.04
Zeit: Dienstag, 02. Dezember 2014, 16:00 Uhr

Abstract zum Vortrag:
Recent work has highlighted the role of entrepreneurial organizations as institutional intermediaries. As intermediaries these organizations can powerfully alter local institutional arrangements, filling institutional voids, providing the infrastructure for markets, and serving as platforms for the disruption of social practices that reinforce inequalities and/or the institutionalization of new social practices that enable and solidify inclusive development.  Yet, the conditions for their success have received scant attention.

In this paper we analyze the conditions for the success of an institutionally embedded program headed by Gram Vikas, an organization that has pursued programs related to socio-economic development and social change in rural Orissa, one of the poorest states of India, over the last thirty years. We focus on a program to improve sanitation in poor rural areas whilst also tackling institutionalized inequalities in the social system. We analyze data from a survey of 569 participating villages and monthly progress reports over a five year period. We use time series models of monthly counts of latrines to identify community features that provide leverage for Gram Vikas’ mobilizing efforts and contribute to its success. We are interested in practical organizing issues, including the role of status and caste differences; the project’s focus on organizing women in villages; whether women can capitalize on education, committee participation and other village associations; and whether participants could leverage marriage exchanges and diffusion across villages to press for reform within villages.

Johanna Mair is Professor for Organization, Management and Leadership at Hertie School of Governance, Berlin and Hewlett Foundation Visiting Scholar at the Center on Philanthropy and Civil Society, Stanford University. She is member of the editorial board of several international journals, including Strategic Management Journal and Academy of Management Discoveries. Her research focuses on social innovation, institutional change, and corporate strategy.

Eva Boxenbaum, Mines ParisTech:

„A TROPOLOGICAL PERSPECTIVE ON CATEGORY EMERGENCE”

Ort:  TC.4.04
Zeit: Dienstag, 18. November 2014, 16:00 Uhr

Abstract zum Vortrag:
A TROPOLOGICAL PERSPECTIVE ON CATEGORY EMERGENCE

Eva Boxenbaum & Eero Vaara

In spite of an increasing interest in category emergence, we lack understanding of its cognitive and especially cognitive linguistic underpinnings. Previous research has pointed out that metaphors may serve an important purpose in category emergence, and we wish to complement this view by offering a tropologcial perspective that elaborates on the key role of the four master tropes – metaphor, metonymy, synechdoche and irony – in category emergence. In particular, we argue that metaphor serves to create new meaning through the formation of similarity clusters and schemas; metonymy integrates the emergent category, by means of contiguity, in wider networks of meaning and cognitive infrastructure; synecdoche offers exemplifying representations (prototypes) and labels of an emergent category; and irony provides reflective sensemaking devices for distancing and resistance, which either facilitates or impedes the consolidation of an emergent category. Thus, all four master tropes by themselves, and especially in combinations, serve as means of structuring the cognitive content, inserting the emergent category into a wider cognitive infrastructure, and mobilizing members and audiences.

Eva Boxenbaum is Professor of Management at Centre de Gestion Scientifique, Mines Paris Tech. She is also professor at Copenhagen Business School, Department of Organization. She is on the editorial board of the European Management Journal. Her research revolves around material and visual dimensions of institutionalizing innovations, sustainable construction, translation of innovations, institutional entrepreneurship and socially responsible innovation. She is co-editor of the Organization Studies Special Issue on the “The Material and Visual Turn in Organization Theory”.

John Amis, University of Edinburgh Business School:

"ORGANIZATIONAL IDENTITY AND INSTITUTIONAL COMPLEXITY: A PROCESS STUDY"

Ort:  TC.4.04
Zeit: Dienstag, 04. November 2014, 16:00 Uhr

Abstract zum Vortrag:
The purpose of this study was to examine the interaction between organizational identity and institutional logics. Over eight years we followed attempts by the leadership of the Memphis Grizzlies basketball franchise to develop a new identity following the organization’s relocation from Vancouver. In so doing, we develop new insights into the construction of organizational identity, unveil the ways in which organizational identity and institutional logics are mutually constitutive, and further the process of reconciling social actor and social constructivist views of identity by exposing the ways in which identity is constituted in an environment of pronounced institutional complexity.

John Amis is Chair in Strategic Management and Organisation at the University of Edinburgh Business School. His research interests center on issues of organizational and institutional change. His work has been published in journals that include Academy of Management Review, Academy of Management Journal, American Journal of Public Health, Human Relations, Organizational Research Methods, and Journal of Change Management. He is co-editor of an upcoming Special Issue of Organization Studies titled. ‘Inequality, Institutions and Organizations’. John has been a runner-up for the annual Academy of Management Journal ‘Best Paper’ award, and has also won Best Paper awards at the annual meetings of the Academy of Management (Organizational Development and Change division), Western Academy of Management, and Southern Management Association. John sits on a number of editorial boards including Academy of Management Review, Organization Studies, Journal of Management Inquiry, and Journal of Change Management, at which he is an Associate Editor. His work on childhood obesity was funded by the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation.

Giuseppe Delmestri und Markus Höllerer:

Giuseppe Delmestri:

"MEN OF HONOR! INSTITUTIONALLY EMBEDDED META-GAMES IN POST ACQUISITION INTEGRATION"
 

Markus Höllerer:

"RECURSIVE CATEGORIZATION AND ENACTMENT OF ROLE IDENTITIES IN PLURALISTIC INSTITUTIONAL CONTEXTS"

Ort:  TC.4.04
Zeit: Dienstag, 07. Oktober 2014, 16:00 Uhr

Royston Greenwood, University of Alberta:

„ SUCCEEDING TO FAILURE: HYBRID ORGANIZATIONS AND INSTITUTIONAL COMPLEXITY”

Ort:  TC.4.04
Zeit: Dienstag, 07. Oktober 2014, 16:00 Uhr

Abstract zum Vortrag:
SUCCEEDING TO FAILURE: HYBRID ORGANIZATIONS AND INSTITUTIONAL COMPLEXITY

Giulia Cappallaro, Paul Tracey & Royston Greenwood

Understanding how hybrid organizations cope with multiple institutional prescriptions is important not simply because they are an organizational form that needs understanding, but also because they provide an excellent opportunity for exploring the relationship between field and societal level pressures on the one hand, and of organizational and intraorganizational processes on the other. We report the results an ethnographic study of a public-private Italian hospital where new governance and organizational arrangements were introduced in an attempt to blend the principles of a private logic into the traditional, publicly funded and highly professionalized hospital system. At the time data collection began, the hybrid had been widely acknowledged for several years as an exemplary success. However, four months after entering the field the hybrid began to unravel and was subsequently dismantled. The paper identifies the mechanisms that triggered a successful hybrid towards subsequent failure.

Royston Greenwood is Telus Professor of Strategic Management at Alberta School of Business. He has been named Distinguished Scholar of the Organization and Management Theory Division of the Academy of Management in 2014. He is on the editorial board of several journals in the field of management and organization studies, among them Academy of Management Annals, Organization Studies and the Journal of Management Studies. Since 2013 he is honorary member of the European Group for Organization Studies (EGOS). His research deals with the dynamics of change processes in organizations, with a special interest in institutional complexity and the management of commercial service-organizations and entrepreneurs.