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Social Ecological Economics

Since becoming formally established with an international academic society in the late 1980s, ecological economics has advanced understanding of the interactions between social and biophysical reality. It initially combined questioning of the basis of mainstream economics with a concern for environmental degradation and limits to growth, but has now advanced well beyond critique into theoretical, analytical and policy alternatives. Social ecological economics and transformation to an alternative future now form core ideas in an interdisciplinary approach combining insights from a range of disciplines including heterodox economics, political ecology, sociology, political science, social psychology, applied philosophy, environmental ethics and a range of natural sciences.

Our research team for Social Ecological Economics

Clive Spash, PhD
Clive Spash, PhD

Stellvertretender Institutsvorstand

Associated colleagues in and outside the institute

Dr. Karin Dobernig
Dr. Karin Dobernig

Forschungsassistentin am Institute for Ecological Economics, WU Wien

Mgr. Christian Kerschner, M.Sc., Dr.
Mgr. Christian Kerschner, M.Sc., Dr.

Postdoctoral Researcher and Lecturer, Department of Environmental Studies Masaryk University, Brno, Czech Republic

Tone Smith-Spash, PhD
Tone Smith-Spash, PhD

Research Assistant, Lecturer

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Some of our relevante publications

Fellner, W. and Spash, C.L. (2014). The Illusion of Consumer Sovereignty in Economic and Neoliberal Thought. ideas.repec.org/p/wiw/wiwsre/sre-disc-2014_02.html Vienna: Institute for Environment and Regional Development. pp.37.

Fellner, W. and Spash, C.L. (2015). The Role of Consumer Sovereignty in Sustaining the Market Economy. In Reisch, L.A. and Thørgersen, J. (eds.). Handbook of Research on Sustainable Consumption (pp.394-409). Cheltenham: Edward Elgar.

Fellner, W.J. (2017). Work and Leisure: Money, Identity and Playfulness. In Spash, C.L. (ed.). Routledge Handbook of Ecological Economics: Nature and Society (pp.214-223). Abingdon: Routledge.

Puller, A. and Smith, T. (2017). A Critical and Realist Approach to Ecological Economics. In Spash, C.L. (ed.). Routledge Handbook of Ecological Economics: Nature and Society (pp.17-26). Abingdon: Routledge.

Spash, C.L. (2011a). Social ecological economics: Understanding the past to see the future. American Journal of Economics and Sociology 70(2): 340-375.

Spash, C.L. (2011b). Social Ecological Economics: Understanding the Past to See the Future. In Lee, F.S. (ed.). Social, Methods, and Microeconomics: Contributiuons to Doing Economics Better (pp.39-74). Oxford: Wiley-Blackwell.

Spash, C.L. (2016). Social ecological transformation. Environmental Values 25(3): 253-258. Spash, C.L. (2017a). Combining Social, Ecological and Economic Knowledge: How Critical Realism Can Help. In Lindner, U. and Mader, D. (eds.). Critical Realism Meets Kritische Sozialtheorie (pp.forthcoming). Bielefeld: Transcript Verlag.

Spash, C.L. (2017b). Social Ecological Economics. In Spash, C.L. (ed.). Routledge Handbook of Ecological Economics: Nature and Society (pp.3-16). Abingdon: Routledge.

Spash, C.L. (2017c). Soziales, ökologisches und ökonomisches Wissen: Zum Synthetisierungspotenzial des Critical Realism. In Lindner, U. and Mader, D. (eds.). Critical Realism meets kritische Sozialtheorie. Ontologie, Erklärung und Kritik in den Sozialwissenschaften (pp.forthcoming). Bielefeld: Transkript.

Spash, C.L. and Dobernig, K. (2017a). Theories of (Un)sustainable Consumption. www-sre.wu.ac.at/sre-disc/sre-disc-2017_04.pdf Vienna: Institute for Multilevel Governance and Development. pp.26.

Spash, C.L. and Dobernig, K. (2017b). Theories of (Un)sutainable Consumption. In Spash, C.L. (ed.). Routledge Handbook of Ecological Economics: Nature and Society (pp.203-213). Abingdon: Routledge.